Pennsylvania becomes decisive swing state in US election

Global Business

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Pennsylvania is one of a handful of key swing states in the upcoming U.S. presidential election. Swing, because the vote there could go either way.

The eastern part of the state is known for its tough blue collar work force and despite its strong Democratic Party roots, the race between Hillary Clinton and Donald trump is expected to be close.

CCTV America’s Sean Callebs reports.

Pennsylvania becomes decisive swing state in US election

Pennsylvania becomes decisive swing state in US election

Pennsylvania is one of a handful of key swing states in the upcoming U.S. presidential election. Swing, because the vote there could go either way. CCTV America’s Sean Callebs reports.

In the city of Scranton where industrial and manufacturing jobs have withered away, business leaders believe if the area is to thrive, Pennsylvania needs to get the next U.S. president to truly think globally.

During this heated election season, it is relishing its time in the political spotlight.

This hardscrabble town – built on the backs of coal miners and those who worked in rail yards – will have an important voice in determining who the next U.S. President becomes.

The last time Pennsylvania backed a Republican candidate was in 1988. 2016 is expected to be a close race.

While some people support Democrat Hillary Clinton, they also know that Donald Trump’s mantras – bring back manufacturing jobs and “Make American Great Again” – are hitting a sympathetic chord here, despite a different look in reality.

Indeed, the glory days when Scranton was an important cog in the industrial revolution are long gone. At the end of the 19th century – as, an attractive site for immigrants willing to work in the rail and coal industries – the city had a population of close to 140000.

Today it’s almost half of that number.

It is true that many U.S. companies sent jobs overseas-taking advantage of cheap labor to boost profits.

However, University of Scranton Political Science Professor Michael Allison points out the U.S. is producing more steel and manufactured goods than it did 20 years ago. So, China bashing is misplaced frustration as wages here stay flat, and jobs vanish.

With Scranton expanding its economic base, 25 percent of the city’s jobs are now in the health care field-with three hospitals and a new medical college. Another 10 percent are in higher education.

Scranton’s Chamber of Commerce said it’s time for the city to embrace the realities of the global economy-and push the next U.S. President to get the world’s two largest economies to work together more closely.


Joseph Minarik on US economy and job market

For a more detailed look at the U.S. economy and job market, CCTV America’s Rachelle Akuffo spoke with Joseph Minarik, senior vice president and director of Research for Committee for Economic Development.