Explaining the South China Sea

CCTV News

Explaining the South China Sea

Explaining the South China Sea

Thousands of years ago, the islands in South China Sea were uninhabited. By legal definition, they were terra nullius—No Man’s Land. Chinese mariners discovered the islands in South China Sea thousands of years ago, and mapped them. The dispute over the South China Sea islands has heightened recently.

Thousands of years ago, the islands in South China Sea were uninhabited. By legal definition, they were terra nullius—No Man’s Land. Chinese mariners discovered the islands in South China Sea thousands of years ago, and mapped them.
The dispute over the South China Sea islands has heightened recently. CCTV’s Wang Guan explains some of the issues.

Explaining the South China Sea

Explaining the South China Sea

Thousands of years ago, the islands in South China Sea were uninhabited. By legal definition, they were terra nullius—No Man’s Land. Chinese mariners discovered the islands in South China Sea thousands of years ago, and mapped them. The dispute over the South China Sea islands has heightened recently. CCTV's Wang Guan explains some of the issues.

Explaining the South China Sea

Explaining the South China Sea

Thousands of years ago, the islands in South China Sea were uninhabited. By legal definition, they were terra nullius—No Man’s Land. Chinese mariners discovered the islands in South China Sea thousands of years ago, and mapped them. The dispute over the South China Sea islands has heightened recently.

  • britbob

    Effective sovereignty Argument Uninhabited Islands: A case that supports this view of effective sovereignty is relevant is the Minquiers and Ecrehos Case, France/UK of 17th November 1953. In this case both the UK and France had requested the ICJ to determine which country held sovereignty over the uninhabited Islets and rocks in the Minquiers and Ecrehos. France had claimed sovereignty because of historic sovereignty going back to the Dutchy of Normandy in the 11th century while the UK claimed that Jersey had historically exercised administrational jurisdiction on them. The Court decided that in the absence of valid treaty provisions, they considered the argument that the British government has exercised effective control to be superior, so that sovereignty control over the Minquiers and Ecrehos belonged to the UK. (the UK had protested to the French government when a French national had intended to build a house on one of the islats and any deaths occurring on the islets were dealt with by inquests held on Jersey). ICJ Minquiers & Ecrehos Judgment, 17 Nov 1953, p28, paras 6 & 12.
    No delimitation between states with opposite or adjacent coasts may be affected unilaterally by one of those states. For some interesting judgments on territorial seas and to gain an understanding as to how the world court deals with such disputes:

    https://www.academia.edu/10574593/Falklands_Islands_Territorial_Waters

    • wfraser11

      britbob the troll..WTF WTF WTF? Malay and Indonesian and Filipino natives were present in the acs before chinese voyagers arrived. They own the islands not china.