Spanish gov’t debate whether to get rid of siesta, shorten work day

Global Business

Spanish gov't debate whether to get rid of siesta, shorten work day 2

The siesta is a longtime Spanish tradition of a two-hour afternoon nap or midday meal. But that could soon be a thing of the past.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has added his voice to those calling for a shorter working day that stops at 6 p.m rather than 7 p.m or later.

CCTV America’s Dan Williams reports.
Follow Dan Williams on Twitter @Danielclearcut

Spanish gov't debate whether to get rid of siesta, shorten work day

Spanish gov't debate whether to get rid of siesta, shorten work day

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has added his voice to those calling for a shorter working day that stops at 6 p.m rather than 7 p.m or later.

Those in favor of the change believe it would improve the quality of life and increase productivity.

Although a number of companies in Spain have moved towards a more compact working day, many more continue with the traditional extended lunch break. Even some smaller business owners believe change would be beneficial.

But others are worried the change could have serious consequences for business. But, for those in Spain who prefer the status quo, there’s no need to panic yet. Following a divisive election, Spain is still without an elected government.

Those who enjoy a long lunch can continue to do so for the foreseeable future.