Most Brazilian football players won’t strike it rich

Global Business

Most Brazilian football players won't strike it rich.00_00_51_15.Still002

In Brazil, football-crazy kids light up at the mention of stars such as professional footballer Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, but those dreams may be too far out of reach. The harsh reality is that the vast majority of Brazil’s professional football players earn salaries barely above the country’s minimum wage.

CCTV America’s Paulo Cabral reports.

Most Brazilian football players won\'t strike it rich

Most Brazilian football players won\'t strike it rich

In Brazil, football-crazy kids light up at the mention of stars such as professional footballer Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, but those dreams may be too far out of reach. The harsh reality is that the vast majority of Brazil's professional football players earn salaries barely above the country's minimum wage. CCTV America's Paulo Cabral reports.

According to figures from Brazil’s football confederation, 82.4 percent of professional players earn $260 or less each month.The country’s minimum wage is $235 a month.

About 15 percent have monthly salaries ranging from $260-$27,000, and less than 3 percent make more.

As in most sports, there are a small number of stars who command the big bucks at major clubs and a vast reserve of professionals that keep the ball rolling in smaller teams and lower leagues.

With hard work and some luck, a decent living is within reach of many young players, but the data shows that becoming a millionaire will likely remain just dreams for most.


Mike Bako of Daily National on funding of Olympic athletes

Like football, Olympic medals bring fame and fortune to some athletes, but how much governments are willing to fund Olympians is very mixed.

In the United States, athletes receive little government funding. Between 2009-2012 the U.S. Olympic Committee had a budget of nearly $800 million, but only 10 percent went directly to supporting athletes. Germany’s athletes earn a little more than $2,000 a month. McKinsey estimates China’s annual sports budget is around $700 million.

CCTV America’s Michelle Makori interviewed Sports Managing Editor of The Daily National Mike Bako on what impact government funding has on Olympic athletes.

Mike Bako of Daily National on funding of Olympic athletes

Mike Bako of Daily National on funding of Olympic athletes

Like football, Olympic medals bring fame and fortune to some athletes, but how much governments are willing to fund Olympians is very mixed. In the United States, athletes receive little government funding. Between 2009-2012 the U.S. Olympic Committee had a budget of nearly $800 million, but only 10 percent went directly to supporting athletes. Germany's athletes earn a little more than $2,000 a month. McKinsey estimates China's annual sports budget is around $700 million.