Barbie’s Big Makeover: Cultural shift fuels Mattel’s diversity push

Global Business

Marketing expert Paul D'Arcy on how companies adapt to cultures2

U.S. toy-maker Mattel is remaking its iconic Barbie doll. The company is adding 7 skin tones, 22 eye colors and three new body types: curvy, tall and petite.

Tanking Barbie sales were a key factor in Mattel seeing 8 straight quarters of falling revenue.
Consumer tastes have changed dramatically since the doll’s launch in 1959.
Toy experts say companies like Disney and MGA entertainment snapped up a large market share, thanks to their range of diverse, relatable characters and personalities.


A look at the changing face of Barbie through the years
A look at the culture of Barbie through the years

A look at the culture of Barbie through the years

The iconic toy called Barbie has been a household name in the U.S. for decades. Here's a look at how the doll, and culture of Barbie has changed through the years. CCTV America's Rachelle Akuffo reports.


Marketing expert Paul D’Arcy on how organizations adapt to culture changes
CCTV America’s Rachelle Akuffo spoke to Paul D’Arcy. He’s Senior Vice President and head of marketing at Indeed.com.
Barbie’s Big Makeover: Cultural shift fuels Mattel’s diversity push

Barbie’s Big Makeover: Cultural shift fuels Mattel’s diversity push

U.S. toymaker Mattel is remaking its iconic Barbie doll. The company is adding 7 skin tones, 22 eye colors and three new body types: curvy, tall and petite. Tanking Barbie sales were a key factor in Mattel seeing 8 straight quarters of falling revenue as a whole. Consumer tastes have changed dramatically since the doll's launch in 1959. Toy experts say companies like Disney and MGA entertainment snapped up a large market share, thanks to their range of diverse characters and personalities. CCTV America's Rachelle Akuffo spoke to Paul D'Arcy. He's Senior Vice President and head of marketing at Indeed.com.

A Rehabs.com report showed what the average woman would look like with Barbies proportions.
Your waistline would be smaller than your head, and your legs would be 50 percent longer than your arms instead of 20 percent.
Your neck wouldn’t be able to support your head.

The top-heavy body and child-size feet mean that you would topple over or have to walk on all fours.
And if you’re hungry or thirsty, you’d only have enough room for half a liver and a few inches of intestine.