Leroy Mwasaru: From poop to power

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Nairobi teen Leroy Mwasaru talks about his Human Waste Bioreactor that could be a huge economic and environmental game changer. Nairobi teen Leroy Mwasaru talks about his Human Waste Bioreactor that could be a huge economic and environmental game changer.

Seventeen‐year‐old Leroy Mwasaru is not unlike most high school students. He enjoys blogging, hanging out with his friends, and is a student leader at his school in Kenya.

But, when the school wanted to build a new dormitory for its students, it faced a challenge: dealing with the growing human waste problem contaminating nearby water sources.

 

Leroy Mwasaru: From poop to power

Leroy Mwasaru: From poop to power

Seventeen‐year‐old Leroy Mwasaru is not unlike most high school students. He enjoys blogging, hanging out with his friends, and is a student leader at his school in Kenya. But, when the school wanted to build a new dormitory for its students, it faced a challenge: dealing with the growing human waste problem contaminating nearby water sources.

“So, something had to be done and really quick since nobody wants feces in their water,” explained Leroy.

That’s when Leroy, and a few of his friends, came up with an idea: create a Human Waste Bioreactor that’s powered by the students’ own human waste.  But, they don’t want to stop here.  Leroy believes the technology has far greater promises for the future.

“In the project lies a very big potential,” said Leroy.  “It can also be used for lighting and electricity.”

From Nairobi, Leroy Mwasaru joined Mike Walter in our Los Angeles studio to discuss his design and what could be a huge economic, political, and environmental game changer.