Mexicans in Spain keep customs from their country alive

Americas Now

DIADEMUERTOS In Spain

Being away from home for a holiday can be lonely. But it doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate. Correspondent Gerry Hadden reports on how some Mexicans living in Spain are honoring traditions from their homeland abroad.

For many, holidays are best spent with family members and friends.  And for those far away from home it can be challenging to celebrate long-time traditions. The “Day of the Dead,” also known as All Saints Day or Halloween in the United States, is a chance for Latinos to reconnect with their lost or departed loved ones.  In Mexico that means parties and pageantry, often in the cemeteries themselves.  

Ancient native traditions in Latin America were strongly influenced by Spain after the conquistadors brought Catholicism to the region.

Gerry Hadden talked to some Mexicans far from home, in Barcelona, about how they try to keep the “Day of the Dead” tradition alive. 

Mexicans in Spain keep customs from their country alive

Mexicans in Spain keep customs from their country alive

"Americas Now" Correspondent Gerry Hadden reports on how some Mexicans living in Spain are honoring traditions from their homeland abroad. For many holidays are best spent with family members and friends. But for those far away from home it can be challenging to celebrate long time traditions. The "Day of the Dead," also known as All Saints Day or Halloween in the United States, is a chance for Latinos to reconnect with their lost or departed loved ones. In Mexico that means parties and pageantry, often in the cemeteries themselves. Ancient native traditions in Latin America were strongly influenced by Spain after the conquistadors brought Catholicism to the region. Gerry Hadden talked to some Mexicans far from home, in Barcelona, about how they try to keep the tradition alive.