A swim team for girls with Down Syndrome inspires

Americas Now

AN GAME CHANGER DOWN SYNDROME 3

They joined a swimming team with the hope of improving their physical and mental abilities. Little did they know they’d become World Champions. Coach Paloma Torres has changed the lives of girls with Down Syndrome through her synchronized swim team called “Special Sirens.”

A student of psychology in Mexico, Torres combined her passion for swimming in Peru to help girls with Down Syndrome increase their coordination and concentration. The idea achieved great results both in and out of the swimming pool.  Not only did the girls form strong bonds with each other, their team performed so well together, they went on to enter competitions and have won over 20 medals.

Across the globe, more than 200 thousand children are born each year with Down Syndrome. It’s a disorder that limits an individual’s intellectual and physical abilities and can be identified by distinct facial features.  But many can go on to lead productive lives. “Special Sirens” in Mexico is a good example.

Torres says it took longer to train the girls on “Special Sirens” than other kids she coaches who do not have Down Syndrome. But she says the effort has been completely worth it. The Sirens have given it their all and achieved success beyond their wildest dreams.  

Take a look at this week’s Game Changer Paloma Torres and see just how “in synch” her “Secret Sirens” are.

A swim team for girls with Down Syndrome inspires

A swim team for girls with Down Syndrome inspires

They joined a swimming team with the hope of improving their physical and mental abilities. Little did they know they’d become World Champions. Coach Paloma Torres has changed the lives of girls with Down Syndrome through her synchronized swim team called “Special Sirens.” She's this week's Game Changer on "Americas Now."