Apple bites into streaming music

Global Business

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Apple has thrown its hat into the streaming music arena with its Apple Music service recently launching in more than 100 countries. For 10 U.S. dollars a month, users can listen to all the music Apple has streaming rights to. CCTV America’s Mark Niu filed this report from San Francisco.

Follow Mark Niu on Twitter @MarkNiuWrite

Apple bites into streaming music

Apple bites into streaming music

pple has thrown its hat into the streaming music arena with its Apple Music service recently launching in more than 100 countries. For 10 U.S. dollars a month, users can listen to all the music Apple has streaming rights to.


Of the 110 countries where Apple Music is available, we on the Digital Team thought it would be neat to see (and hear) which songs are No. 1 in each country. We randonly selected 11 of those nations and put together a playlist of that country’s top song, as determined by top40-charts.com and hotmusiccharts.com.

Here’s our playlist:


Australia: Like I’m Gonna Lose You – John Legend
Brazil: Excreve Ai – Luan Santana
Denmark: See you Again – Wiz Khalifa
Honduras: Fanatica Sensual – Plan B
Kazakhstan: Fire in our Hearts – Swanky Tunes, C. Todd Nielsen
Lebanon: Lean On – Major Lazer, Snake & MO
Panama: Cool for the Summer – Demi Lovato
Saudia Arabia: Flashlight – Jessie J
South Africa: Honey, I’m Good – Andy Grammar
Spain: El Perdon – Nicky Jam, Enrique Iglesias
Switzerland Goodbye – Feder Feat. Lyse

 


Chinese companies shape growing digital music industry
In China, 478 million people listen to music online, more than the entire population of the U.S., but revenue generated from the industry is almost nothing. Internet companies like Tencent are trying to figure out how to get consumers to pay for their tunes. CCTV’s Lin Yijing filed this from Shanghai.

Chinese companies shape growing digital music industry

Chinese companies shape growing digital music industry

In China, 478 million people listen to music online, more than the entire population of the U.S., but revenue generated from the industry is almost nothing. Internet companies like Tencent are trying to figure out how to get consumers to pay for their tunes. CCTV's Lin Yijing filed this from Shanghai.


Michael Brandvold on the future of digital music
For more on the digital music industry, CCTV’s Michelle Makori spoke with Michael Brandvold, a music marketing and digital strategy expert.

Michael Brandvold on the future of digital music

Michael Brandvold on the future of digital music

For more on the future of digital music, CCTV's Michelle Makori talked to Michael Brandvold, a music marketing and digital strategy expert.

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