Photo: 2011 Japan Earthquake anniversary

[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_000_hkg10157141_1_0.jpg]450
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference at Abe's official residence in Tokyo on March 10, 2015. Abe held a press conference to commemorate the fourth anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster, also known as the Great East Japan Earthquake. AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464269454_1_0.jpg]300
A general view shows Onahama port in Fukushima prefecture, in March 11, 2011 (top) and February 28, 2015 (bottom), in this combination picture released by Kyodo on March 7, 2015, ahead of the four-year anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_000_hkg10153366_1_0.jpg]280
Britain's Prince William (2nd L) looks over significant land clearance after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster from a hill top in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture on March 1, 2015. Prince William arrived in Tokyo on February 26 for a four-day visit. AFP PHOTO / POOL / KAZUHIRO NOGI
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_000_hkg10157031_1_0.jpg]250
A volunteer member prays at an altar for Takayuku Ueno's family members killed during the March 11, 2011 earthquake. AFP PHOTO / KAZUHIRO NOGI
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_japan-nuclear_murp_1.jpg]190
Anti-nuclear protesters hold placards during a rally in Tokyo, Sunday, March 8, 2015. Thousands of anti-nuclear protesters marched through Tokyo on Sunday, calling for the government to put an end to atomic power in the country. The march comes amid the run up to the fourth anniversary of the 11 March earthquake and tsunami that sent the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant into multiple meltdowns. The banner reads " No Nukes." AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_correction-japan-tsun_murp_1.jpg]240
In this Aug. 27, 2010 photo, the original headquarters of Yagisawa Shoten Co. stands in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan. The traditional soy-sauce maker, destroyed by a giant tsunami four years ago, has made a comeback, defying tsunami-scale odds. The secret lies in a little white bottle, named "the miracle," which holds the special ingredients that were passed down for decades. AP Photo/Yagisawa Syoten Co.
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464411820_1.jpg]190
Men wearing radiation protective masks work in front of big black plastic bags containing radiated grass from the decontamination operation as cranes and chimneys of Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are seen in the background at an area devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture February 24, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464411834_1.jpg]230
A monument and a stone statue of Jizo (R) for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, are seen near big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation at a temporary storage site in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 22, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464366475_1.jpg]230
Big black plastic bags containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation are dumped at a seaside, devastated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Tomioka town, Fukushima prefecture, near Tokyo Electric Power Co's (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant February 22, 2015. Many residents of Okuma, a village near the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant, are angry about government plans to dump some 30 million tons of radioactive debris raked up after the March 2011 nuclear disaster in a sprawling waste complex on their doorstep. Few believe Tokyo's assurances that the site will be cleaned up and shut down after 30 years. In the four years since the disaster, Japan has allocated over $15 billion to lower radiation levels around the plant. Every day, teams of workers blast roads with water, scrub down houses, cut branches and scrape contaminated soil off farmland. That radiated trash now sits in plastic sacks across the region, piling up in abandoned rice paddies, parking lots and even residents' backyards. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464373386_1.jpg]230
A Palestinian schoolgirl prepares to fly a kite to show solidarity with the Japanese people, near the Japan-funded housing project in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip March 9, 2015. The event was organised by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) to mark the fourth anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands and set off a nuclear crisis in Japan. REUTERS/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464269661_1.jpg]240
The tsunami-devastated town government office building (C) and Minamisanriku town in Miyagi prefecture are seen in these images taken March 13, 2011 (top) and February 25, 2015 (bottom), in this combination picture released by Kyodo on March 7, 2015, ahead of the four-year anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464364872_1.jpg]230
Thousands of lanterns are lit up to mourn for the victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Natori, Miyagi Prefecture, in this photo taken by Kyodo March 8, 2015, ahead of the four-year anniversary of the disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464269657_1.jpg]220
A general view of an area in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture, is seen in March 13, 2011 (top) after it was devastated by a tsunami, and in February 24, 2015 (bottom), after recovery efforts, in this combination picture released by Kyodo on March 7, 2015, ahead of the four-year anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_000_hkg10157117.jpg]190
Japanese Nobel literature prize laureate Kenzaburo Oe delivers a speech before press in Tokyo on March 10, 2015, one day before the 4th anniversary of the tsunami and nuclear accident in Fukushima. Oe criticized Abe government's nuclear policy to reopen the nation's nuclear power plant. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_japan-nuclear_murp_1_0.jpg]150
Anti-nuclear protesters hold placards during a rally in Tokyo, Sunday, March 8, 2015. Thousands of anti-nuclear protesters marched through Tokyo on Sunday, calling for the government to put an end to atomic power in the country. The march comes amid the run up to the fourth anniversary of the 11 March earthquake and tsunami that sent the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant into multiple meltdowns. The banner reads " No Nukes." AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi
[img src=http://www.cctv-america.com/wp-content/flagallery/japan-earthquake/thumbs/thumbs_cfp464269592_1.jpg]180
The tsunami-devastated Kesennuma town in Miyagi prefecture is seen in these images taken March 15, 2011 (top) and February 28, 2015 (bottom), in this combination picture released by Kyodo on March 7, 2015, ahead of the four-year anniversary of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster. REUTERS/Kyodo