Tackling the smuggling of exotic animals in Peru

Americas Now

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Animals from the Amazon rainforest are being captured and sold at an alarming rate. Police conduct raids to stop the trade but bribery is widespread. Correspondent Dan Collyns reports from Peru on the multi-billion dollar business of wildlife trafficking.

The illegal trafficking of wildlife is one of the largest, transnational, organized criminal activities in the world.

It ranks fourth after the trafficking of drugs, arms, and of human beings and the global market is reported to be worth up to $20 billion dollars annually.

Beyond the clear environmental impacts, this illicit trade is depriving developing economies of billions of dollars in lost revenue.

“Americas Now” travels to bio-diverse Peru, home to one-tenth of the Amazon rainforest and many other ecosystems.

As Dan Collyns reports, it’s a country where despite strong economic growth, poverty persists and the illegal trade in wildlife is rampant.

Smuggling of exotic animals in Peru

Smuggling of exotic animals in Peru

Animals from the Amazon rainforest are being captured and sold at an alarming rate. Police conduct raids to stop the trade but bribery is widespread. Correspondent Dan Collyns reports from Peru on the multi-billion dollar business of wildlife trafficking.

  • p behler

    congratulations to the one who has filmed and presented this piece by devoting his time and passion to presenting this clip to the world. Having lived in Peru as a Peace Corps Volunteer, I can believe that (1) many people are uneducated about the implication of species survival and (2) are using animal trafficking as a means to pull themselves out of devastating poverty. I still have hopes that the Peruvian government will become stronger in preventing this illegal activity.