The Heat: Corruption in India

The Heat

long lines at India's banks India’s businesses and citizens endure long bank lines.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi removes two of India’s most heavily used currency notes from circulation, creating long lines at banks and leaving millions strapped for cash.

CCTV Correspondent Shweta Bajaj explained how business and people are dealing with the new policy. 

To explore the new policy’s impact on tax evasion and corruption:

  • Swati Dhingra,  assistant professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
  • Sadanand Dhume, resident fellow with the American Enterprise Institute and a South Asia columnist for The Wall Street Journal.
  • Samir Saran, vice president of the Observer Research Foundation and an author and commentator.
The Heat: Corruption in India PT 1

The Heat: Corruption in India PT 1

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi removes two of India’s most heavily used currency notes from circulation, creating long lines at banks and leaving millions strapped for cash. CCTV Correspondent Shweta Bajaj explained how business and people are dealing with the new policy. To explore the new policy’s impact on tax evasion and corruption: Swati Dhingra, assistant professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Sadanand Dhume, resident fellow with the American Enterprise Institute and a South Asia columnist for The Wall Street Journal. Samir Saran, vice president of the Observer Research Foundation and an author and commentator.

The Heat: Corruption in India PT 2

The Heat: Corruption in India PT 2

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi removes two of India’s most heavily used currency notes from circulation, creating long lines at banks and leaving millions strapped for cash. To explore the new policy’s impact on tax evasion and corruption: Swati Dhingra, assistant professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Sadanand Dhume, resident fellow with the American Enterprise Institute and a South Asia columnist for The Wall Street Journal. Samir Saran, vice president of the Observer Research Foundation and an author and commentator.