At COP22, world leaders anticipate Trump presidency

CCTV News

In this May 31, 2015 file photo, a woman cools herself on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, in the southern Indian state of Telangana.  The U.N. weather agency said on Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, that 2016 is set to break the record for the hottest year since measurements began in the 19th century. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A., File) In this May 31, 2015 file photo, a woman cools herself on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, in the southern Indian state of Telangana. The U.N. weather agency said on Monday, Nov. 14, 2016, that 2016 is set to break the record for the hottest year since measurements began in the 19th century. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A., File)

Though there are 66 days left in the Obama’s administration, the stated views and campaign promises of U.S. president-elect Trump are omnipresent at the UN’s climate change summit in Morocco.

CCTV America’s Dan Williams reports. Follow Dan Williams on Twitter @Danielclearcut

At COP22, world leaders anticipate Trump presidency

At COP22, world leaders anticipate Trump presidency

Though there are 66 days left in the Obama’s administration, the stated views and campaign promises of U.S. president-elect Trump are omnipresent at the UN’s climate change summit in Morocco. CCTV America's Dan Williams reports.

Throughout his campaign in 2016, Trump made statements referring to climate change as a “hoax,” a divestment of government funds from green energy, and pushed his agenda for less regulation on environmental issues. He also pledged to pull the U.S. from its commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement.

For many at COP22, a U.N. climate conference in Morocco, this has created an air of uncertainty since the Paris Agreement officially entered into force November 4th – just a few days before the U.S. presidential election took place.

The Paris Agreement, formulated at COP21 in Paris last year, commits participating countries to pursue efforts that will limit the global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees, and focus economic development towards low-carbon solutions.

What you should know about the Paris Agreement on climate change

French President Francois Hollande on Tuesday urged the United States to respect the “irreversible” Paris Agreement on climate change, and said France will lead a dialogue on the topic with President-elect Donald Trump “on behalf of the 100 countries that have ratified” the deal.

Hollande praised U.S. President Barack Obama for his role in getting the landmark pact adopted in the French capital last year.

“The United States, the most powerful economy in the world, the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, must respect the commitments that were made,” he said. “It’s not simply their duty, it’s in their interest.”

From left, France's President Francois Hollande, Morocco's King Mohammed VI, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Morocco's Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar and U.N. climate chief Patricia Espinosa of Mexico pose prior to the opening session of the U.N. climate conference in Marrakech, Morocco, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

From left, France’s President Francois Hollande, Morocco’s King Mohammed VI, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Morocco’s Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar and U.N. climate chief Patricia Espinosa of Mexico pose prior to the opening session of the U.N. climate conference in Marrakech, Morocco, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa’ab Elshamy)

Earlier, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he hopes Trump will shift his course on global warming and “understand the seriousness and urgency” of addressing the problem.

“As president of the United States, I’m sure that he will understand this, he will listen and he will evaluate his campaign remarks,” Ban told reporters in Marrakech.

The Paris Agreement was signed by more than 190 countries and has been formally approved by more than 100 of them, including the United States and even oil-rich Saudi Arabia.

Ban called international climate action “unstoppable” and said that no country, “however resourceful or powerful,” is immune from the impacts of global warming.

“We have no right to gamble with the fate of future generations — or imperil the survival of other species that share our planet,” Ban told the conference.

Trump’s election has created uncertainty about the U.S. role in the Paris deal, which calls on all countries to reduce or curb their greenhouse gas emissions and encourages rich countries to help poor ones deal with climate change.

On Monday, several thousand activists marched in Marrakech to demand environmental justice, just a few miles away from where high-level U.N. climate change talks are being held.

protesters in Morocco

Hundreds protest against climate change and urge world leaders to take action, in a march coinciding with the Climate Conference, known as COP22, taking place in Marrakech, Morocco, Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa’ab Elshamy)

King Mohammed VI of Morocco urged delegates at the conference to translate their commitments into actions.

“What’s at stake is the very existence of man,” the king said. “It is therefore our joint duty to work hand in hand to protect humanity.”

“Wait and see attitudes and negligence when addressing climate change and its effects will lead to dire consequences, jeopardizing security and stability and exacerbate the already expanding hotspots of tension and crises throughout the world. In the name of our shared destiny and in the name of our historic responsibility, I urge all parties to work on translating our commitment to the values of justice and solidarity into actions.”

Story compiled with sources from The Associated Press.


Paul Bledsoe on Trump’s climate priorities

To further discuss Trump’s stand on climate change and the Paris agreement, CCTV America’s Elaine Reyes spoke with Paul Bledsoe, president of Bledsoe & Associates, LLC.