Harlem voters give thoughts on divisive election

CCTV News

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African Americans played a very important role in presidential votes. And the cultural capital of Black America – New York’s Harlem – has a lot to say about this election cycle.

CCTV America’s Sean Callebs reports the story.

Harlem voters give thoughts on divisive election

Harlem voters give thoughts on divisive election

African Americans played a very important role in presidential votes. And the cultural capital of Black America - New York's Harlem - has a lot to say about this election cycle. CCTV America's Sean Callebs reports the story.

“They’re frightened. This is a view in many people the most historic election in the history of the nation. It will tell us very distinctly, which way we’re going,” said Lloyd Williams, the CEO Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce.

Polls show blacks overwhelmingly support her over Donald Trump. But that will do Clinton little good if black voters stay home on Election Day. African-Americans have NOT been turning out in big numbers in early voting like they did for Barack Obama.

“There’s a lot of people in the media that are saying she’s taking the black vote for granted and I don’t believe that,” said said Nylissa “Ny” Whitaker, from Harlem for Hillary.

Harlem is a melting pot-mostly African American and Hispanics. With New York firmly in the Democrat Party’s corner, these voters are heading out to neighboring Pennsylvania – a swing state – to drum up support for Clinton. Their response to the backlash from this country’s white majority as more minorities register to vote.

“There are certain corners of our country where that is not welcome-where people are not okay with the face of America not being a white person, but a person of color,” said Juan Rosa, from Barack Obama Democratic Club.

And – they say Trump showed just how out of touch he is with African-American voters by saying -blacks live in poverty, with poor schools, and grim prospects -so why not just vote for him..

Lloyd Williams is upping the ante for black voters-arguing that its Barack Obama’s legacy that’s really at stake.

“The prospect of him being replaced by Donald Trump is something that is very hard to fathom and for us to accept,” said Lloyd Williams, the CEO Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce said.

But if this U.S. election has shown us anything it’s that legions of American voters feel disenfranchised. We will know Wednesday if apathy – and frustration with the status quo – become the enduring legacy of campaign 2016.