Hurricane Matthew to flood neighboring states

CCTV News

APTOPIX Hurricane Matthew A vehicle is submerged after Hurricane Matthew caused flooding on Saturday Oct. 8, 2016 in Charleston, S.C. Matthew continued its march along the Atlantic coast Saturday, lashing two of the South’s most historic cities and some of its most popular resort islands, flattening trees, swamping streets and knocking out power to hundreds of thousands. (Michael Pronzato/The Post And Courier via AP)

Hurricane Matthew left at least 10 people dead in the United States as it continues to travel up the Atlantic seaboard from Florida.

Neighboring states are warning residents of what to expect in the next few days. CCTV’s Nitza Soledad Perez reports.

Hurricane Matthew's death toll rises to 9 in the US

Hurricane Matthew's death toll rises to 9 in the US

Hurricane Matthew left at least 10 people dead in the United States as it continues to travel up the Atlantic seaboard from Florida. Neighboring states are warning residents of what to expect in the next few days.

The fury of Hurricane Matthew has battered Florida’s east coast Friday with sustained winds of 130 kilometers per hour. Meanwhile, neighboring states warned residents for what’s to come in the next few days.

Daytona Beach in the morning then Saint Augustine to the north along the Atlantic coast. Destructive winds and a storm surge from Hurricane Matthew as central and northern Florida took a relentless beating on Friday.

Electrical transformers blew up trees brought down lines. An estimated one million people were reported without power. Florida’s governor kept sounding the alarm.

Thousands of Florida residents moved to shelters.

Coastal communities in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina are on notice. The storm is heading their way with sustained winds of 120 kilometers an hour.

Millions of people are still in the path of this deadly hurricane. The U.S. Atlantic coast has still more to brace for in these coming days.