Aging tech becoming more valuable

Global Business

aging-tech-becoming-more-valuable-2

Today, releases of smartphones and tech gadgets are happening at a feverish pace. But like fine wines, there are some technologies like the iPod that are getting more valuable with age.

CCTV America’s Mark Niu gave us the story.

Aging tech becoming more valuable

Aging tech becoming more valuable

Today, releases of smartphones and tech gadgets are happening at a feverish pace updating models that are just a few years old. But like fine wines, there are some technologies like the iPod that are getting more valuable with age. CCTV America’s Mark Niu gave us the story.

Tim Erskin loves his music and his iPods. He owns four of them, including a 2nd generation iPod classic-released in 2002. He hops on eBay, and gets a surprise:

$20,000 for an iPod!

First generation Ipod. (Photo: Rjcflyer@aol.com on Wikipedia Commons)

First generation Ipod. (Photo: Rjcflyer@aol.com on Wikipedia Commons)

That’s for a sealed first generation, which seems cheap compared to some other prices. Another sealed special-edition U2 iPod sold for $ 90,000.

At the computer history museum in Silicon Valley, technology is celebrated for more than just its monetary value. They have a historical value: An Osborne 1, the first commercially successful portable computer, which you can actually pick up like a piece of luggage; a collection of 1990s cellphones; and an iPod prototype from the year 2000, which would hit the market a year later. Oct. 23rd, 2001.

Osborne 1 portable computer, early model. (Photo: Bilby on Wikimedia Commons)

Osborne 1 portable computer, early model. (Photo: Bilby on Wikimedia Commons)

Ubergizmo co-founder Hubert Nguyen says in tech, special editions can make a big difference. The difference between boxed and unboxed can cost you thousands.

“If you have an old banged up iPod gen 1, it’s probably not worth a lot, but if it’s brand new and untouched in mint condition, then you can fetch $20,000,” Nguyen said.

Identifying what tech is worth isn’t easy – even when it’s boxed in mint condition.

Nguyen is currently holding on to a boxed first generation Google Glass Explorer. But since most gadgets lose value quickly, he says it’s best not to collect vintage tech as an investment. Buy it, he said, for the enjoyment of owning a piece of history.


Scott Schober on electronics turned collectibles

For more on electronics turned collectibles, CCTV America’s Rachelle Akuffo interviewed Cybersecurity expert and CEO of Berkeley Varitronics Systems, Scott Schober.