Intense fighting continues on the front line in Aleppo

CCTV News

Intense fighting continues on the front line in Aleppo 2

The Syrian city of Aleppo is divided. Literally split in two between the warring government forces and rebels. Residents are trapped, with near-daily bombs and constant fighting.

CCTV’s Xu Dezhi has more from the front lines in Aleppo.

Intense fighting continues on the front line in Aleppo

Intense fighting continues on the front line in Aleppo

The Syrian city of Aleppo is divided. Literally split in two between the warring government forces and rebels. Residents are trapped, with near-daily bombs and constant fighting. CCTV's Xu Dezhi has more from the front lines in Aleppo.

In early August, rebel fighters broke the siege and opened a corridor through eastern Aleppo. But then forces of the two sides became balanced. With attacks followed by counter-attacks, no significant development has occurred during recent weeks.

Trails can still be seen in the air after fighter jets of the Syrian Air Force flew into the battlefield.

Southern Aleppo is very close to the front line and this place used to be a residential area with unfinished buildings. And across that main road is the exact front line where the Syrian army and the rebels are having confrontations.

After Aleppo became embroiled in the crisis in 2012, the Syrian government moved displaced people to the 1070 Residential Area. Now as the war has touched southern Aleppo, people have been displaced again.

Those who fled the 1070 residential area told of their horrifying experience.

“The shelling started when I was making my lunch. I went to my neighbor and he told me it’s from the 1070 Residential Area. Suddenly a gas container exploded and shrapnel hit our home,” local resident Um Abd said. “We need an apartment to live. Rodents are everywhere. We just have no place to go.”

Zafer is a father with 12 family members. He grows angry and looks helpless as he talks about his experience.

“We took nothing with us at all. Some organizations donated the tents. We were given a piece of paper to get blankets, furniture and cooking utensils,” Zafer said. “I am so sad. Me, and the people here, we are innocent people with dignity. I am responsible for my family. Now we are disgraced by this situation.”

Adults worry about how they will survive the coming winter. They look at this ground, a former amusement park where their children are now playing, ignoring what happened to them. But it seems it’s the Syrian people who are losing this terrible game.