Responding to terror attacks, Germany bans the burqa

CCTV News

GERMANY - OCTOBER 22: Veiled women in a pedestrian presinct in Munich. (Photo by Ulrich Baumgarten via Getty Images) GERMANY – OCTOBER 22: Veiled women in a pedestrian presinct in Munich. (Photo by Ulrich Baumgarten via Getty Images)

Germany’s interior minister has called for a partial ban on the wearing of the Burqa.

The controversial proposals come despite initial skepticism from Thomas De Maiziere, and suggest growing pressure from hardliners inside the ruling Christian Democrats to act tough: after a series of terrorist attacks this summer, and an ongoing refugee crisis.

CCTV’s Guy Henderson reports.

Responding to terror attacks, Germany bans the burqa

Responding to terror attacks, Germany bans the burqa

Germany’s interior minister has called for a partial ban on the wearing of the Burqa. The controversial proposals come despite initial skepticism from Thomas De Maiziere, and suggest growing pressure from hardliners inside the ruling Christian Democrats to act tough: after a series of terrorist attacks this summer, and an ongoing refugee crisis. CCTV’s Guy Henderson reports.

Film night at the Migration Hub – a Europe-wide network created to help out in Germany’s refugee crisis. Most focus on welcoming new arrivals.

“There are many, many schemes that the government is doing, but it really has to happen from the bottom up,” said Alexandra Embiricos from Migration Hub Berlin. ” For example, creating Apps: designed by refugees themselves.”

In Berlin on Friday, Germany’s Interior Minister Thomas De Maiziere backed a series of tough measures seemingly aimed at assimilation: including a partial ban on the burka.

“Whoever wants to work in public services cannot be completely covered. The head scarf is a different issue. We’re talking about completely covering. The law is at kindergartens, schools and high schools, teachers and students, in courtrooms, the judge and jury, and witnesses.” Maiziere said, “It will apply everywhere where you have to be identified.”

There are no queues outside asylum registration centers this summer. Indeed, the bottleneck is at the other end.

The Federal government is under pressure to speed up the process of deportation, because many failed asylum seekers aren’t leaving the country even when they’re ordered to.

That’s partly why authorities are calling in outside help, signing a contract thought to be worth around $16 million with consulting firm Mckinsey.

“It is the aim of this study to find out, in all these layers of government, which parts are responsible for making this process move faster”. German Interior Ministry Johannes Dimroth said.

Alongside efforts to welcome refugees, is a push to send those not welcome back home. On both fronts, Germany still needs help.