Protesters in South Korea shave their heads against THAAD

CCTV News

Kim Hang-gon has his head shaved during a protest against a plan to deploy an advanced U.S. missile defense system in their neighborhood, in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, July 21, 2016.  (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man) Kim Hang-gon has his head shaved during a protest against a plan to deploy an advanced U.S. missile defense system in their neighborhood, in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

In the Republic of Korea, more than 900 residents of Song-jew County shaved their heads to protest plans to deploy a U.S. missile defense system in the area.

CCTV America’s Jack Barton gave us this report.

Protesters in South Korea shave their heads against THAAD

Protesters in South Korea shave their heads against THAAD

In the Republic of Korea, more than 900 residents of Song-jew County shaved their heads to protest plans to deploy a U.S. missile defense system in the area. CCTV America’s Jack Barton gave us this report.

The hair kept going, but the men and a handful of women kept coming.

In total, 902 Seongju residents protested with hair against their government’s plan to deploy a U.S. missile defense system known as THAAD in their area at the end of next year.

Residents have their heads shaved during a rally to oppose a plan to deploy an advanced U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, in Seongju, South Korea, Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

Residents have their heads shaved during a rally to oppose a plan to deploy an advanced U.S. missile defense system called Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense, or THAAD, in Seongju, South Korea, Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (Kim Jun-beom/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

“Now the government spends 30 percent of its budget on military spending,” Lee Jae-wook, an anti-THAAD demonstrator said. “Instead of that we need a peaceful solution.”

Many residents said they don’t believe THAAD is effective and worry they will become a DPRK target if there is a missile attack.

Some opposition politicians said the deployment is harming diplomatic relations with Russia and China, who worry about THAAD’s radar penetrating deep into their territory.

At the end of the day though this is a small demonstration, hundreds of kilometers from the capital.

South Korean protesters wearing masks of U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye, right, march to oppose a plan to deploy THAAD, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

South Korean protesters wearing masks of U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye, right, march to oppose a plan to deploy THAAD, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Opinion polls show that that majority of South Korean’s do support the deployment of the THAAD system. But that does not mean that these demonstrations are not having an impact. President Park Geun-hye said she is now considering shifting the missile shield host site.

However, at Monday’s Liberation Day celebrations, she insisted there would be no backtracking on deployment.

“THAAD is also a self-defensive measure we’ve decided to deploy to protect the lives of our people from North Korea’s reckless provocations,” Geun-hye said. “I don’t think this kind of issue with our people’s lives at stake is a political football.”

Back in Seongju the daytime protest turned into a nighttime candle vigil, which residents say they will maintain each evening until the government changes its mind.