Skateboard company brings water to indigenous Mexican community

CCTV News

Skateboard company brings water to indigenous Mexican community

In Mexico, four young entrepreneurs have created the “Nahual Skateboard” company. They feature designs from the Huicholes, an impoverished indigenous group. The company said some of the sale proceeds will help a particular community which is facing water shortages on their ancestral lands.

CCTV America’s Martin Markovits reports.
Follow Martin Markovits on Twitter @MartinMarkovits

Skateboard company brings water to indigenous Mexican community

Skateboard company brings water to indigenous Mexican community

In Mexico, four young entrepreneurs have created the “Nahual Skateboard” company. They feature designs from the Huicholes, an impoverished indigenous group. The company said some of the sale proceeds will help a particular community which is facing water shortages on their ancestral lands. CCTV America’s Martin Markovits reports.

Deep in Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains in an area known as Wirarika, live the Huicholes. They are one of the few indigenous tribes who have preserved their culture and whose art has been celebrated around the world. But now their way of life is in danger because of a lack of water.

Founded in 2014, Nahual Skateboards features original and printed colorful artwork designed by Nahaul craftsmen.

The Huicholes have been impoverished for years. Known to work in grim conditions on tobacco plantations, many have immigrated to cities to find better opportunities.

Now, they have another problem – access to fresh water. Changes to the environment along with an increase in mining and construction projects have severely depleted their wells.

Through an initial online auction, Nahual Skateboards hopes to raise about $4,000 to help bring recyclable and portable water to the homes of the Huicholes people. And after that a percentage of sales.

And while they acknowledge it might not be enough to fix the whole problem, they believe it’s an important first step to getting the Mexican government more involved in protecting the welfare and ancestral lands of the Huichol people.

  • Robert Forman

    Are the Huichol artists paid for their designs?