Artist depicts endangered crane thriving in uninhabited area

CCTV News

Artist depicts endangered crane thriving in uninhabited area2

The beloved and endangered red-crowned crane has found an unusual place to thrive: in the 250 kilometers (155 miles) demilitarized zone between the DPRK and the Republic of Korea, also known as the DMZ. Now, a museum in Washington is paying homage to these special birds through a unique sculpture and painting exhibition by Korean-American artist Michael Joo.

CCTV’s Andrea Arenas has more.
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Artist depicts endangered crane thriving in uninhabited area

Artist depicts endangered crane thriving in uninhabited area

Deforestation and agricultural expansion have played a significant role in the decline of the red-crowned crane's population. CCTV's Andrea Arenas reports.

“I probably, you know, spent the better part of my childhood sleeping under a quilt emblazoned with red-crowned cranes,” Joo said.

Deforestation and agricultural expansion have played a significant role in the decline of the red-crowned crane’s population. They freely migrate through the Korean Demilitarized Zone, composed of 250 kilometers of untouched territory.

There are roughly 2,500 red-crowned cranes left in existence. The preservation of the wetland habitat in Asia is a major challenge, as it’s one of the most heavily populated regions in the world.

Joo, who has been studying the flight patterns of the red-crowned crane in the DMZ for years, shows the importance of these animals through his art and how the absence of humans can sometimes lead to the unintentional, yet fortunate, safekeeping of nature.