Las Vegas turns to new technology to improve water conservation

Global Business

Las Vegas turns to latest technology to improve water conservation 2

Las Vegas is known the world over as America’s gambling mecca, but lately it’s been building a reputation for innovations in water conversation.

CCTV America’s Mark Niu reports.

Las Vegas turns to latest technology to improve water conservation

Las Vegas turns to latest technology to improve water conservation

Las Vegas is known the world over as America’s gambling mecca, but lately it’s been building a reputation for innovations in water conversation. CCTV America’s Mark Niu reports.

La Vegas depends on water in so many, often flamboyant ways. Despite being in one of the driest states in America, the city is determined to beat the odds.

In 14 locations along the water pipeline of the Las Vegas strip, these acoustic devices from Echologics actually listen for water leaks.

This technology from Israeli, Ayekka, uses a sensor inside the pipe to measure water quality.

“It remotely grabs this data so we don’t have to physically grab samples, take it back to the lab and do the analysis. This sits right in situ on the pipe itself out in the field and again we don’t have to bring power to it, so it can go into remote areas,” Matthew Brems, the maintenance engineer manager from Southern Nevada Water Authority said.

Both technologies went through the accelerator-style WaterStart program, which has so far vetted 150 technologies and brought in eight startups to work in Vegas.

“The water industry is very conservative, is very diverse, and it’s highly regulated. So technology companies face a lot of barriers adopted. What we’ve really tried to do here is define the demand. Demand what the market opportunities are recruit the innovation where they can find a first adopter. Somebody that understands the value of their technology and is willing to take a chance to try it out,” Nate Allen, the Executive Director of WaterStart said.

In order for WaterStart to succeed it must find partners.

It now has a big one, MGM Resorts, which has more than 50,000 workers, making it the largest private employer in the state of Nevada. MGM just built this 3 acre park where instead of grass, the landscape looks like the Nevada desert.

Gauges even shut off the fountains when the wind is too strong.

Since the early 2000’s, water levels at Southern Nevada’s main water source – Lake Mead -have declined by 40 meters (131 feet).

Las Vegas’s population also doubled during that time, but still managed to reduce water consumption by nearly 40 percent and loan Southern California $45 million in water reserves.

Vegas is still all about gambling, but not with its water supply.


Giulio Boccaletti discusses projects on water conservation

For more on water conservation technology, CCTV America’s Asieh Namdar spoke to Giulio Boccaletti, managing director for water at The Nature Conservancy.


One More Question for Kumud Acharya: How WaterStart help water problems globally?