Thailand eliminates mother-child HIV transmission

CCTV News

Thailand eliminates mother-child HIV transmission

The World Health Organization said Thailand has become the first country in Asia to eliminate mother to child transmission of HIV. It is the latest in a series of successes for the country’s health authorities, who have long battled the spread of the virus.

In the 1990s, HIV was widespread in Thailand. At that time more than 3000 babies a year were born with the virus.

Until last year, this figure was just 86. But while the news is to be celebrated, there are many other areas of concern, especially infection rates among gay men.

CCTV’s Tony Cheng reports

Thailand eliminates mother-child HIV transmission

Thailand eliminates mother-child HIV transmission

The World Health Organization said Thailand has become the first country in Asia to eliminate mother to child transmission of HIV. It is the latest in a series of successes for the country’s health authorities, who have long battled the spread of the virus. CCTV’s Tony Cheng reports

The result of the programs have led Thailand to be able to declare it is the first country in Asia to halt mother to child HIV transmission.

It is a remarkable achievement for a country that was in the grip of an HIV epidemic a decade ago.

But widespread testing, and universal distribution of antiretroviral drugs have helped hundreds of thousands to deal with their positive status, and prevent transmission to their families.

Dr. Rangsima Lolekha, Thailand’s Ministry of Health, has been running the program. She said Thailand could set an example to the world.

Other risk groups have shown worrying signs of complacency and rising infection rates. However, the battle against HIV is far from won.