Political spectrum shifts throughout Latin America

Global Business

Political spectrum shifts throughout Latin America

Former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was replaced by a more conservative, business friendly administration.

It’s the latest in what appears to be a growing trend across Latin America.

CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough has a look.

Political spectrum shifts throughout Latin America

Political spectrum shifts throughout Latin America

Former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was replaced by a more conservative, business friendly administration. It's the latest in what appears to be a growing trend across Latin America. CCTV America’s Owen Fairclough has a look.

Dilma Rousseff isn’t the first Latin American leader to denounce a coup.

Three others also left office before their term was up: Paraguay’s Fernando Lugo, Honduras’ Manuel Zelaya and Guatemala’s Otto Perez, who was the only conservative among them.

Now add a looming referendum on Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro and it seems what was called “the pink tide” of leftwing leaders is turning.

Brazil’s new finance minister has signaled the changing climate in Brazil.

“We need to set a limit on federal government and public service expenditure,” Henrique Meirelles, Brazilian Interim Finance Minister.

Interim President Michel Temer is considered much more business friendly-as is Argentina’s new center right president, Mauricio Macri.

Macri ditched many of socialist predecessor Cristina Kirchner’s policies that led to showdowns with big business while settling defaulted debts that left Argentina with no credit.


Peter Hakim talks about Latin America’s political landscape

For more on the political changes taking place in Latin America CCTV America’s Rachelle Akuffo spoke with Peter Hakim, president emeritus and senior fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue.