Selfie sacrifice: When showing off meets mortal danger

CCTV News

Terry Tufferson selfies with a twister Australian Terry Tufferson was traveling the outback when he came across this twister. In another era, he may have gone the other direction. (Photo credit: Terry Tufferson)

Admit it, you’ve done it: Taken a selfie and posted it online to share with friends and family.

But with the advent of multiple social media platforms and cameras in every smartphone, snapping the ultimate selfie is becoming increasingly competitive – and dangerous. Every year, more are more injuries – even deaths – caused by taking them. CCTV’s May Lee has more on this global phenomenon. 

Selfie sacrifice: when showing off meets mortal danger

Selfie sacrifice: when showing off meets mortal danger

Admit it, you've done it: Taken a selfie and posted it online to share with friends and family.

A video entitled, 25 Most Dangerous Selfies Ever, has been viewed nearly 33 million times on YouTube. 

Some of the highlights: One guy snapped a selfie atop the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, one while running from a bull in Pamplona, and another young man set himself on fire. 

Social media psychologist Karen North says it has to do with natural human behavior.

“People by their human nature are exhibitionistic and voyeuristic and those two things play into each other,” North said. “For every person who wants to peer into somebody else’s life, there are a bunch of people who want to put up something worthy of being peered into.” 

Confession this adventure-loving reporter has taken some risks for a selfie or two. On a recent trip to Iceland, I captured a few precarious moments: 

Bonus selfie - May Lee at Icelandic geyser

Bonus selfie - May Lee at Icelandic geyser

CCTV's May Lee takes a few perilous selfies of her own on a recent trip to Iceland.

Bonus selfie - May Lee at Icelandic waterfall

Bonus selfie - May Lee at Icelandic waterfall

CCTV's May Lee takes a few perilous selfies of her own on a recent trip to Iceland.

As thrilling as dangerous selfies are, they can go too far. There are a growing number of injuries and even deaths caused by selfies gone wrong. 

According to report by Priceonomics, since 2014, 49 people have died taking a selfie. The victims’ average age was 21. 75% were male.

India has the highest number of deaths at 19 compared to 7 in Russia, 5 in the U.S. and just 1 in China.

Selfies are now banned in parts of India. In Russia, a marketing campaign, complete with graphic warnings of selfie dangers, was launched last year.