Professor Wendy Patrick on US women’s soccer team file wage discrimination complaint

Global Business

Professor Wendy Patrick on US women's soccer team file wage discrimination complaint1

Football, or soccer as it’s called in the U.S., has been in the news for other reasons than sports lately.

The U.S. Women’s National Team has fans in their corner when it comes to their equal pay dispute with the U.S. Soccer Federation.

More than two-thirds of Americans, 68 percent believe the members of the women’s national team deserve to make as much money as their counterparts on the U.S. Men’s National Team, according to a new poll from Public Policy Polling. Just 17 percent disagree.

CCTV America’s Michelle Makori spoke to Wendy Patrick, Attorney and Business Ethics Professor at San Diego State University.

Professor Wendy Patrick on US women\'s soccer team file wage discrimination complaint

Professor Wendy Patrick on US women\'s soccer team file wage discrimination complaint

Football, or soccer as it's called in the U.S., has been in the news for other reasons than sports lately.

The message of support holds across political lines. 81 percent of Democrats say they want the women to receive equal pay, along with 63 percent of Independents and even 55 percent of Republicans.

The U.S. Women’s National Team has been embroiled in this dispute with the federation that governs American soccer since April, when five of the team’s players filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission asking it to investigate whether they had been paid unfairly.

The complaint asserts there is a 25 percent gap between what the top male players and the top female players can make, in large part due to the teams’ bonus structures.

The women are paid a $72,000 salary if they play 20 matches per year for the national team, and they earn an additional $1,350 bonus for winning friendly matches. The men, by contrast, are not paid a salary but earn much larger bonuses for their matches: as much as $17,000 for a win and $5,000 for a loss. Under that structure, the women argue, a man who plays in 20 matches will make at least $100,000 even if his team loses every match, which is more than a woman can make if her team wins every match.

U.S. Soccer has disputed those numbers and the two sides have publicly wrangled over whose version of the facts are correct.

But the minutia of the federation’s internal finances aside, the message from other Americans seems clear: They want the women who won the 2015 Women’s World Cup, and who will enter the 2016 Olympics as the favorites to win a third consecutive gold medal, to earn just as much money as the men.

  • Timothy Smith

    No one watches women’s soccer. No one cares. Their games generate much less revenue then the men’s team. Why therefore, should they get the same pay? As much as he has tried, Obama has not made this country into a socialist police state… we are still a free-enterprise system.