Why Donald Trump lacks support from top Republican leaders

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Why Donald Trump lacks support from top Republican leaders 3

What could a split in one of America’s two main political parties mean for countries trying to anticipate foreign policy moves by the next U.S. government?
 
CCTV’s Jessica Stone reports from Washington.

Why Donald Trump lacks support from top Republican leaders

Why Donald Trump lacks support from top Republican leaders

What could a split in one of America’s two main political parties mean for countries trying to anticipate foreign policy moves by the next U.S. government?

Billionaire businessman Donald Trump is already campaigning as the Republican Party’s presidential candidate. But, for the first time in a generation, the likely GOP nominee doesn’t have support from top Republicans – including Speaker of U.S. House of Representatives, Paul Ryan.

“I am not there right now… and I hope to though and I want to… but I think what is required is that we unify this party,” Ryan said.

Two former Republican presidents, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush, refuse to endorse Trump. Jeb Bush and the 2012 Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, won’t support Trump, either.

2008 Republican candidate John McCain is worried Trump could undermine his re-election campaign for the U.S. Senate in Arizona. McCain has reason to worry.

Republicans hold the majority in the U.S. Senate by just eight seats. Nine of them – including McCain’s – are in tight races for re-election. A groundswell of opposition to Trump could sweep Democrats into the senate majority.

A Democratic majority could undermine the Trans Pacific Partnership, derailing the largest free trade agreement in the Pacific. This matters to Beijing.

“We think global trade rules should be discussed by all countries, not just set by one,” Hong Lei, a spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry said.

A Democratic majority would likely protect future U.S. purchases of Iran’s heavy water. This would help Tehran comply with the hard-won nuclear agreement opposed by many Republicans.

The last time the Republican presidential nominee wasn’t backed by the party establishment was in 1964. That year, Democrats won the presidency, electing Lyndon Baines Johnson. Johnson ended up escalating the Vietnam War, widely regarded as a U.S. proxy war to contain the growing influence of the former Soviet Union and China.