Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict flares up

CCTV News

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Armenia’s parliament is set to vote on a bill that would recognize the independence of neighboring Azerbaijan’s breakaway Nagorno-Karabakh region. Azerbaijan has rejected this, blaming Armenia of trying to derail international peace talks. This follows years of animosity and fighting between the two countries and a recent flare-up in fighting.

CCTV’s Natalie Carney reports from Tbilisi, Georgia.

Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict flares up

Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict flares up

Armenia's parliament is set to vote on a bill that would recognize the independence of neighboring Azerbaijan's breakaway Nagorno-Karabakh region. Azerbaijan has rejected this, blaming Armenia of trying to derail international peace talks. This follows years of animosity and fighting between the two countries and a recent flare-up in fighting. CCTV's Natalie Carney reports from Tbilisi, Georgia.

It is considered one of the world’s longest running territorial disputes.

Nagorno-Karabakh is a landlocked region physically located in southwest Azerbaijan, but its home to a majority ethnic Armenian population, who say they are defending their right to self-determination.

More than 20,000 people were killed during a 6-year long bloody war between Azerbaijan and Armenia. In 1994 a cease-fire was agreed upon, but no peace treaty was signed, leaving the area in limbo. In the two decades since, as many as 3,000 people are believed to have died in fighting between the two sides.

Last month renewed fighting marked the worst violence in 22 years, rattling the region.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan reiterated his country’s support for Azerbaijan, with whom they hold strong economic, religious, and cultural ties.

Russia, Turkey’s friend-gone-foe, has criticized Erdogan for making comments Moscow said instigates war. Russia has a military base in Armenia and has extended a $200 million loan to Armenia for weapons purchases, but it’s arms deals with Azerbaijan is 25 times that.

“This conflict demonstrated that Azerbaijan managed to gain some support in Russia as well,” Senior Fellow Georgian Foundation For Strategic and International Studies Nodar Kharshiladze said.

“I mean Russia’s support was very mild and very disappointing for Armenians.”

The Armenian government’s recognition of an independent Nagorno-Karabakh would do little to resolve the issue. The area is still considered under Azerbaijan’s sovereignty by the international community and the United Nations.

Meanwhile, neighboring Georgia has offered to mediate between the two countries in an effort to boost regional prosperity.

  • joe

    Another thoughtless and misguided article: “Nagorno-Karabakh is a landlocked region physically located in southwest Azerbaijan” purposely leaves out the main point : Treaty of Kars signed Oct 13, 1921 between the Bolshevik and the Kemalist Turks partitioning ancient Armenian lands, that were arbitrarily stolen and conquered and given away to a newly created Muslim Turkish gas station country called Azerbaijan. This is illegal and doesn’t make it “part of Azerbaijan’. . This was right after the Turks implemented the Armenian genocide from 1915-1918.Those lands were liberated. Doesn’t belong to Azerbaijani because they were stolen and given away.

    Not to mention that the current Azerbaijan regime is run by a thug mafia clan despotic ruler that considered one of the worst violators of human rights and freedom of press and jails beats any decent. Armenians have no business being part of that ruin Muslim screw job and the Azeri’s will never win a war. In fact next war may liberate more ancient Armenian lands and a possible regime change for the loser side again.

  • Hov M

    The Autonomous Region of Mountainous Karabagh (Artsakh) declared independence from Azerbaijan because of continued persecution, oppression, and human and civil rights violations by the Azeri Turks. It was attached to Azerbaijan as an Autonomous Region by Joseph Stalin in 1921 and has suffered under Azeri rule from that time onward.
    The Azerbaijanis, who were trying to organize their own state, contested the Armenians’ right to rule Karabagh, even though it was overwhelmingly Armenian. The Azeris first turned for help to the British occupation force led by General Dunsterville, then to the Ottoman army under Nuri Pasha, and finally to the Russian Bolsheviks. With foreign aid, they won out. The next 70-plus years witnessed Azeri persecution of Armenians in an attempt to drive them out and replace them with Azeris, as was done in the Armenian territory of Nakhichevan.