WHO and China join forces on Child Vaccine Awareness Day

CCTV News

WHO and China join forces on Child Vaccine Awareness Day

Promoting public trust in vaccines is the goal behind Child Vaccine Awareness Day.

The World Health Organization and Chinese health officials observed the vaccination process at some clinics. They hope to ease concerns about vaccines after a recent scandal in Shandong Province.  It was discovered that improperly stored vaccines were illegally sold across China. 
Typically, 11 vaccines are provided free for children against infections, like polio and hepatitis B. Vaccines are closely monitored for proper storage and temperature.

There’s also a stringent system for administering vaccines in the United States. CCTV’s Frances Kuo reports on how it works.
Follow Frances Kuo on Twitter @franceskuocctv

WHO and China join forces on Child Vaccine Awareness Day

WHO and China join forces on Child Vaccine Awareness Day

Promoting public trust in vaccines is the goal behind Child Vaccine Awareness Day. There's also a stringent system for administering vaccines in the United States. CCTV's Frances Kuo reports on how it works.

Regulations for child vaccinations in the United States are made on both the state and federal level. But, the process is not an exact science. It must be tailored to each child and constantly evolve with what the science dictates.

“Some states have really long lists, like maybe 10 vaccines that children should have before they start school, and other states may say there are only three,” Kathryn Jacobsen, Professor of Epidemiology at George Mason University said.

Vaccinations are typically given to children in the United States around five years old, kindergarten-age. They usually target diseases like measles, whooping-cough, tetanus and mumps. But there are exemptions.

Some parents may choose to opt out because of personal beliefs like religion. And that’s allowed.

States can only offer *recommendations* on child vaccinations. They’re made by a special advisory board of doctors, governmental representatives and others who review current scientific research – and accordingly, can change those recommendations before the start of every school year.

The U.S. federal government plays more of a regulatory role. It monitors vaccine manufacturers and makes sure the doses they make comply with standards like amounts and proper storage.

“They’re making sure there are codes stamped on every batch of vaccines, and there are lot numbers. Those lot numbers are ones physician offices can record, that way if there ever is a problem with the batch of vaccine, it can be traced back,” Jacobsen said.

There’s also a reporting system in which doctors and parents can report any adverse side effects from vaccines that can be tracked and investigated immediately.

As for worldwide standards, there are none. The World Health Organization plays a part by facilitating licenses of vaccines, particularly in low-income countries. But, it’s up to each country to determine what vaccinations are appropriate.

Dr. David Rutstein on China Vaccine Day and public health
To discuss more about China’s Vaccine Day, Mike Walter spoke with Dr. David Rutstein, vice president for the medical affairs at United Family Healthcare in China.

Dr. David Rutstein on China Vaccine Day and public health

Dr. David Rutstein on China Vaccine Day and public health

To discuss more about China’s Vaccine Day, Mike Walter spoke with Dr. David Rutstein, vice president for the medical affairs at United Family Healthcare in China.