Lessons learned from Three Mile Island nuclear disaster

CCTV News

Jessica Stone 3

The 1979 meltdown at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant was the worst nuclear accident in U.S. history. Surveys show that residents returned to the area, but with caution.

CCTV’s Jessica Stone reports from Pennsylvania.

Lessons learned from Three Mile Island nuclear disaster

Lessons learned from Three Mile Island nuclear disaster

40 years after the devastating Three Mile Island nuclear accident, surveys have found people have returned to the location, but with extreme caution. CCTV's Jessica Stone reports from Pennsylvania. Residents living near Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, where the 1979 meltdown occurred, said they are trying to better prepare for any future nuclear accident after the devastating event four decades ago.

Residents living in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, where the 1979 meltdown occurred, said they are trying to better prepare for any future nuclear accident after the devastating event four decades ago.

Jessica Stone outside of Three Mile Island

Jessica Stone outside of Three Mile Island

Jessica Stone visits the area outside of Three Mile Island in Pennslyvania.

They have seen the impact the accident had on their community. Many still suspect the meltdown is connected to elevated cancer cases in the region. They were painfully aware of how poorly they prepared for the original meltdown.

Towns like Middletown, Pennsylvania now drill twice a year on their emergency evacuation plans, so they’ll know what to do if there’s a problem again at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant.

TMI-Alert’s Eric Epstein on how they monitor radiation

Eric Epstein, Chairman of nonprofit group TMI-Alert, Inc. shows the monitoring equipment he uses to track radiation outside Three Mile Island.

TMI-Alert's Eric Epstein on how they monitor radiation

TMI-Alert's Eric Epstein on how they monitor radiation

Eric Epstein, Chairman of nonprofit group TMI-Alert, Inc. shows the monitoring equipment he uses to track radiation outside Three Mile Island.

Three Mile Island processes revamped to prevent another disaster

Jessica Stone visits the Exelon training center at Three Mile Island.

Three Mile Island processes revamped to prevent another disaster

Three Mile Island processes revamped to prevent another disaster

Jessica Stone visits the Excelon training center at Three Mile Island.

The view inside the Exelon Three Mile Island Training Center in Pennslyvania:

  • lokay5

    Lessons learned from TMI accident? None. See: Fukushima Daiichi.

  • Atoms4Peace1

    Lesson learned – Go ask the workers at TMI Unit 1 who have been safely operating that unit adjacent to the crippled Unit 2 for over 35 years. Apparently antinukes don’t know the difference between a Gen 2 PWR in Pennsylvania and a vintage Gen 1 that was hit by a 60 ft wall of water that killed 20,000. These antinukes would squawk if an asteroid crashed on the earth, killing billions, then vaporizing everything in its wake, including nuclear plants. They have long ignored that Fukushima killed no one, and that TMI workers are still at the site some 35 years later. What does that say about low low radiation? It says that antinukes are alarmists when it comes to these types of events regardless of whether or not anyone died, then or 4 decades later. They have no real validation of projected stochastic effects.