Apple opposes FBI order to unlock California shooter’s phone

CCTV News

Apple opposes FBI order to unlock California shooter's phone.00_00_35_18.Still002

It is a clash of privacy versus security, with the private information of millions of iPhone users now at the center of the debate.

Apple CEO Tim Cook is promising a legal fight after refusing to help the FBI with a request he calls “dangerous.”

CCTV’s Jim Spellman reports.

Apple opposes FBI order to unlock California shooter's phone

Apple opposes FBI order to unlock California shooter's phone

It is a clash of privacy versus security, with the private information of millions of iPhone users now at the center of the debate.Apple CEO Tim Cook is promising a legal fight after refusing to help the FBI with a request he calls "dangerous." CCTV's Jim Spellman reports. Last December, 14 people were killed in the San Bernardino California terrorist attack, and another 22 people were wounded. The two suspects were killed by police. One of the terrorists had an iPhone 5 in his possession. Investigators want to know what's on that phone, but like most iPhones, the information is encrypted. If wrong password is entered 10 times, all the information on the device will be erased. Even Apple cannot access the data. So the FBI wants Apple to build a so-called "backdoor" by creating a new operating system to install on the phone. Apple says building a backdoor into the San Bernardino shooter's phone would give the FBI access to all iPhones. A court has ordered Apple to comply, but the tech giant says to do so would jeopardize the security their customers expect. Encryption has become a controversial issue, especially since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed broad electronic data collection by the U.S. National Security Agency. The intelligence community says it needs access to smartphone data to fight terrorism, but privacy advocates say a backdoor into smartphones goes too far. Apple will fight the FBI in court but ultimately the U.S. Congress may need to write new laws to strike a better balance between privacy and security.

Last December, 14 people were killed in the San Bernardino California terrorist attack, and another 22 people were wounded. The two suspects were killed by police. One of the terrorists had an iPhone 5 in his possession.

Investigators want to know what’s on that phone, but like most iPhones, the information is encrypted.

If wrong password is entered 10 times, all the information on the device will be erased. Even Apple cannot access the data. So the FBI wants Apple to build a so-called “backdoor” by creating a new operating system to install on the phone.

Apple says building a backdoor into the San Bernardino shooter’s phone would give the FBI access to all iPhones. A court has ordered Apple to comply, but the tech giant says to do so would jeopardize the security their customers expect.

Encryption has become a controversial issue, especially since former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed broad electronic data collection by the U.S. National Security Agency.

The intelligence community says it needs access to smartphone data to fight terrorism, but privacy advocates say a backdoor into smartphones goes too far.

Apple will fight the FBI in court but ultimately the U.S. Congress may need to write new laws to strike a better balance between privacy and security.


Tech Expert Eric Schiffer on Apple privacy

For more on the legal battle between privacy and security , CCTV America’s Rachelle Akuffo spoke to entrepreneur and tech expert Eric Schiffer. He is Chairman and CEO of Patriarch Equity, and serves as chairman of Reputation Management Consultants.
Follow Rachelle Akuffo on Twitter @RachelleAkuffo

Tech Expert Eric Schiffer on Apple privacy

Tech Expert Eric Schiffer on Apple privacy

For more on the legal battle between privacy and security , CCTV America's Rachelle Akuffo spoke to entrepreneur and tech expert Eric Schiffer. He is Chairman and CEO of Patriarch Equity, and serves as chairman of Reputation Management Consultants.


IT professional Robert Siciliano on Apple vs. FBI
CCTV America’s Elaine Reyes spoke to IT professional Robert Siciliano via Skype from the U.S. state of Maine. He is an identity theft expert with Hotspot Shield.

IT professional Robert Siciliano on Apple vs. FBI

IT professional Robert Siciliano on Apple vs. FBI

CCTV America's Elaine Reyes spoke to IT professional Robert Siciliano via Skype from the U.S. state of Maine. He is an identity theft expert with Hotspot Shield.