Colombia minister links 3 deaths to Zika

CCTV News

Kerly Ariza, 17 and 20-weeks-pregnant, right, stands at her home in Ibague, Colombia, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. Ariza was diagnosed with clinical symptoms of the Zika virus at a local hospital and is awaiting for the results of laboratory tests. Minister of Health Alejandro Gaviria said that at least 16.000 people have already been already infected with the Zika virus in Colombia, among them more than 500 pregnant women. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara) Kerly Ariza, 17 and 20-weeks-pregnant, right, stands at her home in Ibague, Colombia, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. Ariza was diagnosed with clinical symptoms of the Zika virus at a local hospital and is awaiting for the results of laboratory tests. Minister of Health Alejandro Gaviria said that at least 16.000 people have already been already infected with the Zika virus in Colombia, among them more than 500 pregnant women. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

The Colombian health minister announced on Friday that three people had died of Guillain-Barre syndrome after contracting the Zika virus.

Alejandro Gaviria expressed concern that the virus may have caused the victims to develop Guillain-Barre, a rare disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the nerves.

Most international experts are cautious about whether Zika can trigger Guillain-Barre because other infections and conditions can lead to the illness.

Another six deaths are under investigation.

More than 20,000 people have so far contracted the Zika virus in the country, and according to official estimates, up to 600,000 could be affected in 2016.

Story by The Associated Press.

There are close to 40 cases in Mexico since the first case of the Zika virus was confirmed three months ago.
According to some medical specialists, it’s just a matter of time before the mosquito-borne disease infects many more.
CCTV’s Martin Markovits filed this report from Tapa Chula.

Mexico anticipates rise in confirmed cases

Mexico anticipates rise in confirmed cases

The first case of the Zika virus in Mexico was confirmed three months ago. Mexican authorities now say there are close to 40 cases. According to some medical specialists, it's just a matter of time before the mosquito-borne disease infects many more.

CCTV talked with Kathryn Jacobsen, Professor of Epidemiology at George Mason University, on more on Zika virus spread situation.

Kathryn Jacobsen on Zika virus spread situation

Kathryn Jacobsen on Zika virus spread situation

CCTV talked more Zika virus spread situation with Kathryn Jacobsen , Professor of Epidemiology at George Mason University.