The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya

The Heat

The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya

Iraq’s Saddam Hussein and Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi ruled for decades before being violently overthrown, but a solution ended up turning into chaos for both countries.

Today, Iraq and Libya are two of the most unstable nations in the world. It has led some to ask: Would Iraq and Libya be better or worse off now if Saddam Hussein and Muammar Gaddafi were still in power?

It has been more than four years since a NATO bombing campaign helped rebels topple Gaddafi.
And although many celebrated his demise, there was no peace. International observers refer to Libya today as a failed state, and ISIL also has a foothold in the country.

The Heat was joined by the following guests to discuss a Libya that could have been:

  • Omar Turbi is a Libyan activist.
  • Sukant Chandan is a political analyst who focuses on challenges to the global South, the nations of Africa, Central and Latin America and most of Asia.
The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya pt1

The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya pt1

Iraq's Saddam Hussein and Libya's Muammar Gaddafi ruled for decades before being violently overthrown, but a solution ended up turning into chaos for both countries. Today, Iraq and Libya are two of the most unstable nations in the world. It has led some to ask: Would Iraq and Libya be better or worse off now if Saddam Hussein and Muammar Gaddafi were still in power? It has been more than four years since a NATO bombing campaign helped rebels topple Gaddafi. And although many celebrated his demise, there was no peace. International observers refer to Libya today as a failed state, and ISIL also has a foothold in the country. The Heat was joined by these guests to talk about a Libya that could have been:Omar Turbi is a Libyan activist.Sukant Chandan is a political analyst who focuses on challenges to the global South, the nations of Africa, Central and Latin America and most of Asia.

The U.S.-led war, which started in March 2003, toppled Iraq’s leader Saddam Hussein. Years of sectarian conflict and armed resistance to U.S. troops followed as Iraq was gripped in chaos.

An estimated 500,000 people died in the war.

Now, more than 12 years later, there are some signs of normal living. Violence is still a major problem in Iraq. According to the United Nations, almost 900 people were killed in terrorism and armed conflict incidents across Iraq last month.
ISIL now controls large parts of Libya.

The Heat also spoke with:

  • Taif Jany works with Iraqis who have moved away from their homeland.
  • Richard Becker is with the group called Act Now to Stop War and End Racism.
The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya pt2

The Heat: Post-Saddam Iraq, post-Gaddafi Libya pt2

The U.S.-led war, which started in March 2003, toppled Iraq's leader Saddam Hussein. Years of sectarian conflict and armed resistance to U.S. troops followed as Iraq was gripped in chaos. An estimated 500,000 people died in the war. Now, more than 12 years later, there are some signs of normal living. Violence is still a major problem in Iraq. According to the United Nations, almost 900 people were killed in terrorism and armed conflict incidents across Iraq last month. ISIL now controls large parts of Libya. The Heat continued its discussion by focusing on Iraq this time with these guests: Taif Jany works with Iraqis who have moved away from their homeland. Richard Becker is with the group called Act Now to Stop War and End Racism.

  • Aliaa Shimmary

    I really admire how Richard speaks up his mind. No fear, no twisting reality, no sugar coating or beating around the bush… Straight forward and absolutely blunt. He couldn’t have expressed the truth any better.
    As for Taif, spoken like a real diplomat. I know because I’ve been around them long enough and they never answer the question the way they should. At least Richard admitted the mistake that caused hundreds of thousands of innocent lives. The show must go on…

  • AfriSynergy West

    Omar Turbi is a liar. He lied in 2011 and is lying now. The entire world knows that Libya was far, far better under Gaddafi than it is under these terrorists and traitors. Sukant did an excellent job of countering Turbi’s lies.

  • AfriSynergy West

    Extremism didn’t take hold after NATO killed Gaddafi. Extremism was present from the very beginning of the Western and Arab League sponsoring of that uprising. I recall years earlier when Gaddafi told the Arab League that they are traitors working with the West towards the destruction of Islamic countries, hosting Western countries’ military bases in their countries from which to launch attacks against their neighbors. The Saudi King then threatened him and told him the “grave awaits” him.

  • AfriSynergy West

    Omar Turbi speaks of it always being good to rid a country of a dictator. To further show how dishonest this man is, he would not dare say Saudi Arabia, Qatar or Jordan should be overthrown.

    He admits that he doesn’t even live in or can go to Libya. That was not the case under Gaddafi.