Tragedy spurs calls for better oversight & working conditions in factories

Global Business

spellman labor feature

In 2013, the Rana Plaza textile factory building in Bangladesh collapsed. More than 1,100 workers died. Many others were injured.

The tragedy brought new attention to working conditions around the world, and calls for better oversight by the international clothing companies that rely on factories like those in Rana Plaza that some call death traps.

Last month, an alliance of those international brands including The Gap, Levi Strauss and Nike voluntarily agreed to alter inspection routines of factories worldwide- – streamlining and creating uniformity in safety audit procedures.

The agreement is voluntary, and the results of the audits remain confidential– meaning workers’ groups and local labor ministries won’t get access to safety reports.

In Bangladesh, a separate agreement was enacted in the wake of the Rana Plaza disaster. It’s called the Bangladesh Accord on Fire and Building Safety — a binding agreement with a greater role for workers and more transparency.

The U.N.’s International Labor Organization says it’s a deal that makes sense for workers, factory owners and the international clothing brands.

Workers rights groups see the Bangladesh Accord as a model for agreements in other countries.

CCTV’s Jim Spellman reports from Washington.

Tragedy spurs calls for better oversight and conditions

Tragedy spurs calls for better oversight and conditions

In 2013, the Rana Plaza textile factory building in Bangladesh collapsed. More than 11-hundred workers died. Many others were injured.


Robin Wigglesworth on G20 Summit

For more on what we can expect from the G20 Summit, CCTV America spoke with Robin Wigglesworth.

He’s the U.S. markets editor for the Financial Times.

Robin Wigglesworth on G20 Summit

Robin Wigglesworth on G20 Summit

For more on what we can expect from the G20 Summit, CCTV America spoke with Robin Wigglesworth. He's the U-S markets editor for the Financial Times.