A global landmines ban seems out of reach

Global Business

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It’s been more than 15 years since an international treaty aimed at getting rid of landmines was signed. Still, the continued deployment of mines in places like Ukraine and Syria means people, often innocents, continue to be killed and maimed by this cheap weapon of war.

While the U.S. is not a signatory, it has spent billions of dollars – along with other countries – to clear them from former conflict zones and destroy existing stockpiles.

A mine can be bought for as little as three dollars, but clearing just one can cost a thousand dollars.

There were more than three thousand mine casualties worldwide in 2013, but the number has halved in the last ten years. And the number of areas cleared of mines continues to rise.

Another region that won’t be free of mines any time soon: the demilitarized zone separating the Republic of Korea with the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

The U.S. exempts Korea from its own pledge not to use landmines due to its alliance with Seoul – despite continued mine casualties on both sides.

The U.S. may be moving towards complying with the UN’s mine ban treaty. But with two other major powers – China and Russia – also not signatories, a globally binding deal remains out of sight for now.

CCTV’s Owen Fairclough reports.

A global landmines ban seems out of reach

A global landmines ban seems out of reach

It's been more than 15 years since an international treaty aimed at getting rid of landmines was signed. Still, the continued deployment of mines in places like Ukraine and Syria means people, often innocents, continue to be killed and maimed by this cheap weapon of war.


Mary Wareham on cost-benefit of de-mining programs

For more on landmine clearances, CCTV America spoke with Mary Wareham. She is the advocacy director for Human Rights Watch’s Arms Division.

Mary Wareham on cost-benefit of de-mining programs

Mary Wareham on cost-benefit of de-mining programs

For more on landmine clearances, CCTV America spoke with Mary Wareham. She is the advocacy director for Human Rights Watch's Arms Division.