China considers loosening one child policy nationwide

CCTV News

China considers loosening one child policy nationwide China considers loosening one child policy nationwide

China’s population is aging, which will impact on the ability of the economy to remain vibrant in the future if left unaddressed. Many are expecting a second-child policy to be discussed at the Plenary Session, as part of the next 5-year-plan.

One in ten Chinese citizens is 65 or above, and this proportion is predicted to rise to nearly one third by the year 2050 if China maintains its current control over births.

The working population is also aging, which may affect China’s economic vitality. The situation can be improved to a certain extent by changing the birth policy.

Most parents are in favor of a looser version of the one child policy called the second child policy. But experts say the government should assess whether the current number of hospitals, schools and other facilities can meet future demand before making such a policy.

CCTV’s He Weiwei reports.

China considers loosening one child policy nationwide

China considers loosening one child policy nationwide

China’s population is aging, which will impact on the ability of the economy to remain vibrant in the future if left unaddressed. Many are expecting a second-child policy to be discussed at the Plenary Session, as part of the next 5-year-plan.

More details:

  • China introduced its family planning policy in the late 1970s to control population growth. It limits most urban couples to one child and most rural couples to two, if their first child was a girl.
  • At the end of 2013, A major policy change allowed couples nationwide to have a second child if either parent is an only child.
  • It was estimated that 2 million more babies would be born annually after the policy change of 2013. However, the actual increase last year was only 0.5 million.