4 things you need to know about CPC’s 5th plenary session

CCTV News

CPC for Social Media

Here are four things you need to know about the strategic conference concerning the world’s second largest economy.

1. What is a plenary session of CPC Central Committee?

The CPC Central Committee holds a plenary session at least once a year in Beijing to make policies and decisions. Since 2000, the fifth plenary session of each CPC Central Committee is usually held in October and lasts three to four days.

The current session, which convened on Oct. 26 and runs through Oct. 29, will review proposals for a new five-year plan focused on the country’s economic and social development through 2020. 

2. What do members do at a plenary session?

Generally speaking, seven plenary sessions are held during the five-year tenure of Central Committee members.

Each plenary session focuses on a certain agenda. For example, the first plenary session is for the Party’s personnel arrangement, when Central Committee members elect members of the Political Bureau and other committees. Decisions concerning major national development and economic issues are usually passed at the third plenary session. The fourth plenary session usually discusses party building issues. The seventh prepares for the next National Congress of the Party.

3. What is the fifth plenary session about?

The fifth usually reviews the national economic development plan. The CPC has drafted five-year plans since 1953 to map out strategies for overall economic and social development, setting growth targets and defining development policies.

4. What’s expected to happen at this year’s fifth plenary session?

High on the agenda is the 13th five-year plan of national development. The five years from 2016 to 2020 is considered a critical stage for building a moderately prosperous society in all aspects. The plan will focus on realizing this goal.

The agenda is closely watched as the world’s second largest economy makes efforts to sustain stable economic growth in the following years.

Xinhua