US working mothers still face tough choices

Global Business

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In the United States the majority of mothers work. Fifty-seven percent of mothers with infants are in the labor force and that percentage rises as the children get older.

For some, going back to work is a choice, but for others it’s a necessity. Maternity leave in the U.S. is often unpaid and childcare costs are high. Whatever the reason, one thing most working mothers can relate to is feelings of guilt. CCTV’s Karina Huber reports from New York.

US working mothers still face tough choices balancing home and work

US working mothers still face tough choices balancing home and work

In the United States the majority of mothers work. Fifty-seven percent of mothers with infants are in the labor force and that percentage rises as the children get older. For some, going back to work is a choice, but for others it’s a necessity. Maternity leave in the U.S. is often unpaid and childcare costs are high. Whatever the reason, one thing most working mothers can relate to is feelings of guilt. CCTV’s Karina Huber filed this report from New York. A new study from Harvard's Business School shows that by some measures, the children of working mothers fare better than those raised by stay-at-home moms. CCTV America's Karina Huber interviewed the author of that study, Harvard business school professor Kathleen McGinn about the study's results.


Source: U.S. Dept. of Labor


Kathleen McGinn discusses benefits to children of working moms

A new study from Harvard’s Business School shows that by some measures, the children of working mothers fare better than those raised by stay-at-home moms. CCTV America interviewed the author of that study, Harvard business school professor Kathleen McGinn about the study’s results.

Kathleen McGinn discusses benefits to children of working moms

Kathleen McGinn discusses benefits to children of working moms

A new study from Harvard's Business School shows that by some measures, the children of working mothers fare better than those raised by stay-at-home moms. CCTV America interviewed the author of that study, Harvard business school professor Kathleen McGinn about the study's results.