Piazzolla family gives tango a new twist in Argentina

Americas Now

Pipi Piazzolla on drums. Pipi Piazzolla on drums.

Astor Piazzolla’s musical genius is credited for transforming the music of the tango. While his music was “classic” it challenged tradition. Now his grandson Pipi Piazzolla is passing on his revolutionary work.

Astor learned to play the instrument most associated with the tango, the accordion-like “bandoneon,” when he was a young boy in the 1920’s. One of his early influences came from a Hungarian teacher who introduced him to Bach.

Astor routinely performed in a quintet and mixed jazz into the sound along with new stringed instruments and the piano. His music began to be known as “nuevo tango” or the “new tango.” But his modernization of the music also received a lot of criticism from tango traditionalists.

Despite that criticism, when he passed away in the early 1990’s Astor Piazzolla was hailed as one of the greatest Latin American musicians and composers of all time. He was also acknowledged for inspiring a new generation of tango enthusiasts.

The next generations of Astor’s family have also been an inspiration.

Piazzolla’s grandson, percussionist Daniel “Pipi” Piazzolla, incorporates the influence of his grandfather’s music with his own unique style.

When he is not on tour, Pipi teaches classes in his hometown of Buenos Aires. He passes on knowledge from his formal training as well as the lessons learned from his grandfather.

Take a look at this week’s Urban Voice Pipi Piazzolla who is giving his grandfather’s music a new sound and a new audience.

Twitter: @pipipiazzolla

The Piazzollas give tango a new twist in Argentina

The Piazzollas give tango a new twist in Argentina

Astor Piazzolla’s musical genius is credited for transforming the music of the tango. While his music was “classic” it challenged tradition. Now his grandson Pipi Piazzolla is passing on his revolutionary work.