Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 years later

Americas Now

Submerged houses in New Orleans, Louisiana, 2005. Submerged houses in New Orleans, Louisiana, 2005.

It’s been ten years since one of the worst natural disasters took place in the United States. August 29, 2005 was the day Hurricane Katrina made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane centered on the Louisiana-Mississippi border.

FEMA calls Katrina the most disastrous natural disaster in U.S. history. And according to the U.S. Census Bureau it is the costliest storm in the country’s history as well.

Over 1800 people died as a result of Hurricane Katrina, 40% from drowning. And the extensive devastation it caused along the Gulf Coast from Florida to Texas and beyond totaled over $150 billion.

The catastrophic storm had surges reaching 27 feet. It broke the levees in New Orleans. Rising waters followed. Over a million people along the Gulf Coast were displaced and over 100,000 residents were moved into FEMA trailers.

Now, a decade after the destruction, Correspondent John Zarrella returns to New Orleans, Louisiana and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, two of the cities hardest hit by Katrina. He speaks to residents, business owners and local politicians about the recovery and reconstruction process.

Take a look back with us on the impact of this disaster and the area’s efforts to revitalize as we remember the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 years later

Remembering Hurricane Katrina 10 years later

Now, a decade after the destruction, Correspondent John Zarrella returns to New Orleans, Louisiana and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, two of the cities hardest hit by Katrina. He speaks to residents, business owners and local politicians about the recovery and reconstruction process. Take a look back with us on the impact of this disaster and the area's efforts to revitalize as we remember the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

  • Paul Harris

    Very poignant as I was a California tourist stuck in the Superdome during Katrina.

    Paul Harris, Author, Diary From the Dome Reflections On Fear and Privilege During Katrina