US drought causes golf business to re-think

Global Business

US drought causes golf business to re-think

The ongoing drought in California is forcing everyone to reduce water use by at least 25 percent and that includes the hundreds of golf courses in that state.

A typical golf course uses about 320 million liters of water every year to maintain their green fairways. CCTV’s May Lee filed this report on how more and more golf courses are ripping up their turf in order to survive.

US drought causes golf business to re-think

US drought causes golf business to re-think

The ongoing drought in California is forcing everyone to reduce water use by at least 25 percent and that includes the hundreds of golf courses in that state.A typical golf course uses about 320 million liters of water every year to maintain their green fairways. CCTV's May Lee filed this report on how more and more golf courses are ripping up their turf in order to survive.

The severe drought and higher water costs have forced several golf courses in California to close down with the likelihood of more to come. The interest in the sport has been declining, which is another reason why golf courses are shutting down in California and across the United States. The golfing industry knows it has to start getting more creative to get golfers back into the game.


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Kamiar Mohaddes on El Nino’s weather related impact on world business

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The ongoing drought in California is forcing everyone to reduce water use by at least 25 percent and that includes the hundreds of golf courses in that state.A typical golf course uses about 320 million liters of water every year to maintain their green fairways. CCTV's May Lee filed this report on how more and more golf courses are ripping up their turf in order to survive.