Study: more ‘e-waste’ needs to go to the recycle bin

Global Business

more 'e-waste' needs to go to the recycle bin .00_00_59_05.Still008

A United Nations University (the research and academic arm of the United Nations, based in Tokyo) report says the volume of electronic waste (also known as e-waste) hit a new peak last year, reaching nearly 42 million metric tons.
The United States and China produced the most, accounting for 32 percent of the world’s total e-waste. The report also says that e-waste represented some 52 billion dollars with of potentially reusable resources, but is often going to waste.
CCTV America’s Mark Niu filed this report on the U.S. state of California’s efforts to try and solve this problem.

Study: more 'e-waste' needs to go to the recycle bin

Study: more 'e-waste' needs to go to the recycle bin

A United Nations University (the research and academic arm of the United Nations, based in Tokyo) report says the volume of electronic waste (also known as e-waste) hit a new peak last year, reaching nearly 42 million metric tons. The United States and China produced the most, accounting for 32 percent of the world's total e-waste. The report also says that e-waste represented some 52 billion dollars with of potentially reusable resources, but is often going to waste. CCTV America's Mark Niu filed this report on the U.S. state of California's efforts to try and solve this problem.

More details:

  • The U.S. throws out more old electronics than any country in the world, but they are far from number one when it comes to recycling the waste.
  • An organization called Green Citizen has six San Francisco Bay Area locations and is on a quest to make it convenient for anyone to just drop off their e-waste.