Land of Kuna Indians of Panama in danger from climate change and pollution

Americas Now

AN KUNA LAND.00_05_04_12.Still001

The Kuna have occupied islands in northern Panama for over 100 years. But rising sea levels could see their way of life sink. This entire tribe of indigenous people may be forced off their land by global warming and other challenges.

Much has been made about climate change and the dangers to coastal communities. Rising seas can cause flooding, and land loss. For low-lying islands, the threat is greatest.

Guna Yala, the Caribbean archipelago off Panama’s coast is one such place. The Kuna Indians who make it home are literally battling against the waves. And they may have to re-locate to higher ground.

But as Correspondent Gerry Hadden reports from Panama, the Kuna want the industrialized world that is, the countries that emit the most greenhouse gases allegedly behind climate change to help them move.

Gerry Hadden tells us more about the desperate circumstances of the Kuna community as he talks to members of the tribe during his visit.

While the Kuna Indians have lived on Guna Yala for over a century, the tribe once lived in Panama’s forests for much longer. By some estimates their presence in the country dates back to before the Spanish conquest.

Land of Kuna Indians of Panama in danger from climate change and pollution

Land of Kuna Indians of Panama in danger from climate change and pollution

The Kuna have occupied islands in northern Panama for over 100 years. But rising sea levels could see their way of life sink. This entire tribe of indigenous people may be forced off their land by global warming and other challenges.